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    How To Choose A Pet Parrot For You

By Manuel Rose

There are several things to consider when choosing your feathered friend.

The main 7 things to consider are:

1. What other pets do you currently own?

2. How much room do you have in your home?

3. How much are you willing to spend for your bird?

4. Can you devote enough time towards your companion?

5. How much noise can you or your family members tolerate?

6. Do you have children?

7. Do you live in an apartment where pets are not permitted?

Let's answer the first question, first.

What other pets do you currently own?

Obviously birds and cats are not a good mix, although I've seen certain instances in which

a large Scarlet Macaw defended itself against a prowling feline. I still wouldn't recommend

a parrot with cats in the home. As far as dogs and parrots, it depends on the dog and

the bird. If the dog and parrot are raised together while very young, chances are,

they will get along. My Blue & Gold Macaw was 3 years old when we brought home

a 4-month-old golden retriever. After 10 years they still get along well. As playful as

my dog is, she respects the parrot. A few years ago, I had my Macaw on the rug

walking around the family room until our retriever approached her. The Macaw was

startled & bit the dog on the nose; the dog backed up 5 feet, barked and ran away.

It was the funniest thing I've ever seen. In any case, that was the end of that.

Always use your judgment; if you have a dog that's rambunctious, it may be a bad

idea to leave it alone with the bird.

Second question.

How much room do you have in your home? You must have enough room to
accommodate not only your bird, but its cage too. If you own a house, and have
enough room for a large floor standing cage, then by all means, go get yourself
a large parrot. Some large species such as Macaws, Cockatoos, Amazons and
African Grays, make great companions. If you live in a small apartment,
consider Cockatiels, Parakeets, Lovebirds, Conures and Quakers.

Third question.

How much are you willing to spend for your bird? Large exotic parrots command a
hefty price tag. Hand fed Blue & Gold and Scarlet Macaws retail for about
$2000-$3000 in pet stores. African Grays & Cockatoos average about $2000-$2500.
Amazons go for about $1000-$2000. Recently we've seen a beautiful hand fed
Hyacinth Macaw sell for over $11,000 in a New York parrot store. You must
understand that Hyacinth Macaws are very rare. You will need plenty of space
for a Hyacinth. Conures and Quakers go for around $500-$700. Hand fed Cockatiels
will sell for about $150. Hand fed baby birds may cost you more, but will make
better pets since they've been accustomed to being fed by humans.

Fourth question.

Can you devote enough time towards your companion? Parrots are very social animals.
In the wild, they keep a very tight knit with each other. You must be able to devote
at least 30-60 minutes a day of quality time for your bird.

Fifth question.

How much noise can you or your family members tolerate? Large parrots such as
macaws and cockatoos can be quite vocal if ignored. Smaller parrots
(Cockatiels & Parakeets) will make less noise.

Sixth question.

Do you have children? If you have small children, you must make sure they won't
mishandle the bird. Introduce your children to the bird and show them the correct
way to handle the bird. Let them know that birds are very delicate creatures.

Seventh and last question.

Do you live in an apartment where pets are not permitted? If you live in an apartment
were pets are not allowed, you may still be able to have a small parrot.
Ask your landlord if you can have a small, quiet bird in your apartment.
Parakeets and Cockatiels are a great choice for apartment dwellers.

This article only touches the highlights of living with a parrot.
For much more detailed information, pick up a copy of our
DVD "Parrots-The How-To's Of Caring, Understanding And Training" available here!

If You Find This Article Helpful, Please Link To It!

About The Author

Manuel Rose has researched and owned parrots since childhood.
He spent several years reading numerous books and
speaking to many avian veterinarians.
Manuel currently owns three parrots,
his favorite, a 21-year-old blue and gold macaw
named Samantha, which he weaned as a baby.
Manuel is the CEO of
KnowYourParrot.com and MMRProductions.com

 

 

Why Pet Parrots Can Be Noisy Birds 

 By Manuel Rose 

KnowYourParrot.com African Grey Parrot

Most birds are very vocal, parrots are no exception. Although some parrots, particularly the larger species can be very loud, dogs can be just as bad. Crate or gate your pet dog away from you, and it will begin to bark. Parrots are very social animals, and will consider YOU part of its flock. My blue & gold macaw enjoys being cuddled with me while watching television. My cockatiel is happy just being in the same room with me. Any pet animal, including cats, will cry out for its owner when left alone. Your pet wants to be with you, all day, everyday. 

Since you can’t be with your beloved feathered-friend all the time, there are some things you can do to keep peace with your neighbors. First and foremost, you should have your bird checked out by a good avian veterinarian to eliminate any health problems. You never know. Second, make sure your parrot has enough toys in its cage to keep it occupied. Rotate toys often to prevent boredom. Third, always have plenty of food and clean fresh water available for any pet you own. You should also keep some treats for your pet, but DON’T leave them out all day. Fourth, a room with an outside view, near a window is nice, provided it’s not drafty. DON’T leave your bird in direct sunlight; your bird may become over heated, especially in the warm summer months. Fifth, always keep your bird’s cage clean. 

Loneliness is a terrible thing. Put yourself in your bird’s position. How would YOU feel being locked up, alone in a cage, waiting for some company? In the olden days, pirates took their parrots with them wherever they sailed. Parrots were certainly content riding around on the shoulders of their owners on their ships. 

After you return home from work, always spend plenty of quality time with your bird. Make sure all entry doors and windows are closed. Then, take your parrot out of its cage and talk to it. Act real happy to see your friend. Show your bird some love, and let he or she, know how much you’ve missed it. You should be able to spend at least thirty to sixty minutes a day with your animal-companion. Playtime can be before or after supper. Avoid leaving your parrot alone in front of a television set. Birds have very keen sight and can actually see the scanning lines and flicker from the set. This can be very annoying to them. A radio left on for your bird while you’re away would be a better idea.

Even better, pick up a copy of our new CD, "Parrot Soother VOL. I" available here!

Remember, the more entertained your parrot is, the less chance it will squawk or screech. A happy bird will keep complaints from your neighbors down to a minimum. 

If You Find This Article Helpful, Please Link To It!

About The Author:

Manuel Rose has researched and owned parrots since childhood. He spent several years reading numerous books and speaking to many avian veterinarians. Manuel currently owns three parrots, his favorite, a 21-year-old blue and gold macaw named Samantha, which he weaned as a baby. Manuel is the CEO of KnowYourParrot.com and MMRProductions.com  

 

 

 How To Understand Your Pet Parrot

By Manuel Rose

KnowYourParrot.com Amazon Parrot
 

Understanding basic parrot behavior will make it easier for you to interact with your bird.
Here are some of the most common bird behaviors that I would like to share with you.
Beak Cleaning.
Just as you brush your teeth after every meal, your bird must clean its beak too.
You'll see your parrot wiping its beak on the perch or bars of his cage after eating.
Beak Grinding.
Before your bird’s bedtime, you may hear strange grinding noises coming from your parrot.
This is the sound of a contented bird, and is nothing to be alarmed about.
Stretching.
Just like us, your bird needs to stretch from time to time.
You may notice your bird stretching its wings when you approach him.
That's his way of greeting you.
Catnaps.
It's normal for your parrot to take a few naps during the day.
Hissing Or Attacking.
Birds are territorial creatures and will defend their environment if they feel threatened.
Sometimes a change in your appearance will make the bird think that you are a stranger.
Preening Each Other.
This is a sign of affection.
Birds will preen (groom) each other or you.
If your bird preens your hair or mustache, consider it an honor.
Screaming.
If your parrot feels neglected, she will scream loudly in an attempt to get your attention.
Once your bird starts screaming, it can be a hard habit to break.
Night Frights.
Some birds are prone to night frights, (I know my Cockatiel Is).
These “night frights” occur when there is a loud noise in the middle of the night that will end up startling a bird into a thrashing frenzy.
If this happens to your bird, leave a night light on near its cage.
This article only touches the highlights of living with a parrot.
For much more detailed information, pick up a copy of our DVD "Parrots-The How-To's Of Caring, Understanding, And Training" available here!

If You Find This Article Helpful, Please Link To It!

About The Author
Manuel Rose has researched and owned parrots since childhood.
He spent several years reading numerous books and speaking to many avian veterinarians.
Manuel currently owns 3 parrots, his favorite, a 21-year-old Blue and Gold Macaw named Samantha, which he weaned as a baby.

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